Fitability

Deb Bailey AFPA, MAT, CanFitPro, YMCA

Super setting is a technique we can use to maximize our workout time, building muscle in a very efficient way. We pair two exercises together, without much rest time between them. There are a few ways to do this.

 

Agonist super sets. This means the exercise all target the same main muscle (group), and will involve other muscles as well.  You need to do all exercises at  a weight you can just finish your reps with. For instance, if you want to develop stronger, bigger biceps, an agonist super set could look like this: 

1.       Cable curls, low mount. 4 sets, 6-8 reps.

2.       Incline dumbbell curls. 4 sets, 4-6 reps.

 

Antagonist super sets.  The exercise you pick for this will target first one muscle group and then the opposing muscle group. For instance, you could work on your chest and then your back. I suggest:

1.       Chest - dumbbells flyes. 3 sets, 6-8 reps

2.       Back - lat pulldowns. 3 sets 6-8 reps

3.       Chest - pushups. 3 sets 15-20 reps

4.       Back - cable rows. 3 sets 6-8 reps

 

Tri-Sets.  This simply means adding a third exercise to each muscle group.

 

Staggered super sets. Here we use our rest time between sets to work other muscle groups. This maximizes your time spent and is a very efficient way to get a whole body workout done. For example, between your sets of pushups,  do a plank for 30 seconds. Between your cable rows, do a set of calf raises, holding a set of dumbbells for extra effort.

 

Cardio and Strength super sets. Do a stint of intense cycling, followed by 2-3 sets of leg presses or squats. Since cycling is very quad-centric, the squats will force the tired quads (and hamstrings, glutes and calves) to work harder still. Or if your cardio is on the elliptical, your glutes will get a fair amount of work - hip extension. So then pair that cardio with lunges, focussing on squeezing the glutes, especially on the rear leg.

 

 

 

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