Fitability

Deb Bailey AFPA, MAT, CanFitPro, YMCA

 DIABETES AND EXERCISE

Health Canada reports that approximately 6.6% of Canada’s population, age 20 and older, have been diagnosed with diabetes, and researchers expect an increase to 2.4 million Canadian diabetics by 2016. Also, 6% of Canadian women 46-64 years old, have this disease, and that increases to 10% in the 65 and older group. A woman with type 2 diabetes has an 8 times greater chances of developing heart disease than a women without diabetes. These are sobering numbers, especially in view of the fact that much of that is preventable by making some lifestyle changes.

Some of the changes that will lower your risk of diabetes include:

Read more: Diabetes and Exercise

 Exercise and Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a chronic progressive neurologic disease that affects the part of the nervous system that controls muscle reflexes. It is believed that PD is caused by a reduction in dopamine, which is a neurotransmitter, and so the muscle reflexes are adversely affected. Over time, the person will likely experience slow movements (bradykinesia), a resting tremor, rigidity, and negative changes in his gait and posture.

PD is classified as early, moderate or advanced.  Someone newly diagnosed with early PD will experience only minor symptoms.  In the moderate stage, the person will start to show limitations in his movements, and have a mild to moderate tremor. Substantial limitations in activity, in spite of treatment, mark the advanced stage of PD. Exercise is not a solution to PD, but it will be helpful with balance and rigidity problems.

Read more: Exercise and Parkinson’s Disease

 Exercising with Osteoporosis

 Osteoporosis has become a part of our normal vocabulary these days; it seems we all know someone who has this significant loss of bone mass, or its precursor, osteopenia (low bone mass).

All of us experience some small degree of bone loss every year, after we’re thirty-five, but it is very common amongst older adults in industrialized countries. Once the bone begins to lose mass, it takes on a “honeycomb” appearance, and it loses its ability to withstand fracture. Seniors are much more likely than, say, a young adult, to sustain a fracture through a minor fall or even a sneeze.

More women seem to develop primary osteoporosis in their post-menopausal years, about 50-75 years old, due to the normal estrogen deficiency, and the rate of bone loss exceeds the rate of bone formation. This disease tends to show up in men in their 70’s. Secondary osteoporosis can develop because of various medications, such as ongoing prednisone (glucocorticoid) therapy.

But menopause and medication are not the only risk factors for this disease; some others are:

Read more: Exercising with Osteoporosis

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